Trump impeachment: GOP-led Senate rejects amendments, approves rules of trial

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Trump impeachment: GOP-led Senate rejects amendments, approves rules of trial
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Trump impeachment: GOP-led Senate rejects amendments, approves rules of trial
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In a marathon session that began at 1 p.m. Tuesday and lasted nearly 13 hours into the early morning, the Republican-led Senate rejected all 11 Democratic-proposed amendments en route to approving the rules for the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump.

The only changes to the rules proposed Monday by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell came earlier Tuesday when Republicans reversed their original call for arguments to take place over two days, and instead agreed that arguments would take place over a three-day period. McConnell also agreed to have evidence from the House inquiry automatically admitted as evidence in the Senate trial.

The rules were approved by a party-line vote, 53-47, after more than 12 hours of debate that left many Senate members exhausted by the time the Senate was adjourned shortly before 2 a.m.

Here is how the day unfolded:

1:55 a.m. Final amendments fail and vote on rules passes

Following the rejection of three additional amendments regarding the trail’s timing and procedures, the Senate approved the rules of impeachment as put forth by Sen. McConnell.

The vote passed along party lines 53-47. The Senate then adjourned after nearly 13 hours.

1:19 a.m. 8th amendment to subpoena John Bolton fails following clash

The eighth amendment of the evening, on the question of whether to subpoena former National Security Advisor John Bolton to testify in the impeachment trial, failed along party lines, 53-47.

The vote followed a clash between impeachment manager Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., and White House counsel Pat Cipollone.

“Ambassador Bolton was appointed by President Trump and has stated his willingness to testify in this trial,” Nadler said. “The question is whether the Senate will be complicit in the president’s crimes by covering them up.”

Cipollone, in response, blasted Nadler’s characterization, saying, “Mr. Nadler, you owe an apology to the president of the United States and his family, you owe an apology to the Senate, but most of all, you owe an apology to the American people.”

Chief Justice John Roberts, overseeing the trial, admonished both sides for the rhetoric.

The Senate is now debating additional amendments to the rules related to the trail’s timing and procedures.

12:02 a.m. 7th amendment fails, on to the 8th amendment involving John Bolton

The seventh amendment of the evening, to “prevent the selective admission of evidence and to provide for appropriate handling of classified and confidential materials,” again failed along party lines, 53-47.

The Senate will now take up the question of whether to subpoena former National Security Advisor John Bolton, who Democrats believe could further tie President Trump to the Ukraine affair.

11:21 p.m. 6th amendment fails, but debate continues

Chuck Schumer’s sixth amendment, to subpoena testimony from Mick Mulvaney adviser Robert Blair and OMB official Michael Duffey, failed — again along party lines.

And after a brief, five-minute break it was on to the seventh amendment of the evening to “prevent the selective admission of evidence and to provide for appropriate handling of classified and confidential materials.”

The amendment would require “that if, during the impeachment trial of Donald J. Trump, any party seeks to admit evidence that has not been submitted as part of the record of the House of Representatives and that was subject to a duly authorized subpoena, that party shall also provide the opposing party all other documents responsive to that subpoena.”

10:33 p.m. 5th amendment fails, onto the 6th

The fifth amendment proposed by Democrats — to subpoena Department of Defense documents — has failed along party lines, 53-47, and it is on to the sixth amendment.

Schumer’s sixth amendment would subpoena testimony of Robert Blair, senior adviser to Mick Mulvaney, and Michael Duffey, a senior official at the Office of Management and Budget. Debate on the sixth amendment is starting now.

A brief “quorum call” was held earlier in which Sen. McConnell asked Sen. Schumer to dispense with the debate and “stack” the remaining amendment votes we have.

But Schumer responded that he believes each of the remaining votes are extremely important to the country and the Senate will take each of these votes. Schumer offered to put off the remaining votes until Wednesday, but McConnell did not agree to it.

You can read the rest of Katherine Faulders, Trish Turner, Benjamin Siegel, Stephanie Ebbs, Quinn Owen, and Marc Nathanson’s article at ABCnews.com

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