Radio Signals Detected From Distant Galaxy

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Radio Signals Detected From Distant Galaxy
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Radio Signals Detected From Distant Galaxy
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The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) radio telescope has detected multiple radio bursts coming from a distant galaxy in outer space. A total of 12 repeating radio bursts were received from a galaxy about 1.5 billion light-years away from ours. The findings were recently presented at the 233rd meeting of the American Astronomical Society.

This is the second time repeating radio signals have been detected coming from the same location. In 2015, the Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico recorded a total of 6 radio bursts from the far away galaxy. It is not uncommon for researchers to detect radio bursts from space. However, these are the only two instances of repeated radio bursts ever recorded.

Scientists are working to uncover why the repeating radio bursts appear to be coming from the same location in space, 1.5 billion light-years away. Researchers have already suggested several possible explanations for the repeating bursts. Each potential explanation provides a wealth of fascinating opportunities for future research.

The bursts could be explained by a neutron star with a strong magnetic field, or even two neutron stars colliding.  They could the result be a planet collapsing. The signals might be coming from a black hole. Some researchers have suggested that the signals may be coming from distant intelligent life.

Surprisingly, the CHIME telescope wasn’t even operating at its full capacity when it detected the 12 repeating radio bursts in the summer of last year. CHIME is now fully operational, giving it an even greater ability to “listen” for signals from outer space. Researches hope the new radio telescope will allow greater insights into the cosmos than ever before possible.

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